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    The WTO Secretariat has circulated a meeting notice and list of items proposed for the next meeting, on 25 January 2022, of the Dispute Settlement Body, which consists of all WTO members and oversees legal disputes among them. The meeting notice is circulated in the form of a document officially called an “airgram”.
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  • Deadline extended to submit Aid-for-Trade questionnaires for 2022 Global Review January 21, 2022
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  • DG Okonjo-Iweala calls on ministers to step up negotiating efforts, harvest outcomes January 21, 2022
    Director-General Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala on 21 January called on ministers from a cross-section of WTO members to push ahead in all ongoing negotiations, and work with “pragmatism, creativity, and flexibility” to harvest agreements as and when they are within reach. Ministers broadly accepted her suggestion to accelerate work, both in Geneva and in capitals, so WTO […]
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  • Tenth China Round Table looks at impact of 10 years of China Programme on LDC accessions January 20, 2022
    The Tenth China Round Table on WTO Accessions, held virtually on 18-20 January, celebrated 10 years of the China Programme, with participants reflecting on its impact on the accession of least-developed countries (LDCs) and discussing the future direction of this initiative. The event also provided an opportunity for trade experts to present a study reviewing […]
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Incoterms



 

The International Commercial Terms

 

International Commercial Terms (Incoterms ® 2010) are issued by the International Chamber of Commerce and define the conditions under which international trade transactions take place.

In other words, the Incoterms ® 2010 determine crucial aspects such as the time of the transfer of the risks, which party is liable for cost of transports, insurance costs and custom clearance to name but a few. 

By contrast with domestic transactions, exportation or importation of goods are characterised by a high level of complexity.

Indeed, as you can see in the figure below, an international transaction has to go through several steps likely to be a source of problems.

 

 

Since the Incoterms ®2010 is a standard accepted worldwide, professionals willing to avoid any ambiguity within their International sale contracts, can rely on this strong framework and thereby optimise their risk management processes.

Overall, we can distinguish between two types of Incoterms:

  • – Any mode of transport
  • – Maritime transport applicable for Sea and Inland Waterway

 

 

Incoterms 2010 table

Incoterms 2010 table


In addition, Incoterms ® rules can be divided 4 groups :

 

Group E: Goods at the buyer’s disposal in the Seller’s premises.

Ex Works (Low commitment)

 

Group F: Main carriage paid by the Buyer

FCA, FOB, FAS (moderate commitment)

 

Group C: Main carriage paid by the Seller

CFR, CPT, CIP, CIP (High commitment)

 

Group D: Seller’s responsible up to agreed delivery address

DAT, DAP, DDP (Very High commitment)

 

 

Attention should be paid to the fact that the transfer of ownership is not determined by the Incoterms rules, but by the terms and conditions of the sales contract.

 

Moreover, it is of paramount importance to clearly specify the Incoterms ®2010 version applicable in the sales contracts. Indeed, since prior versions (such as 2000, 1980 versions for instance) might imply different obligations, by embedding the Incoterms ®2010 version in the sales contract, professionals ensure that business relationships are based on clear-cut set of rules.

In addition, it must pointed out that that electronic documents are considered as an equivalent of paper format provided that the Seller and the buyer agree to use this method of communication. ( must be specified in the contract)