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  • Items proposed for consideration at the next meeting of Dispute Settlement Body February 28, 2020
    The WTO Secretariat has circulated a meeting notice and list of items proposed for the next meeting, on 28 February 2020, of the Dispute Settlement Body, which consists of all WTO members and oversees legal disputes among them. The meeting notice is circulated in the form of a document officially called an “airgram”.
    WTO
  • US donates USD 600,000 to further developing countries’ trading capacities February 25, 2020
    The United States contributed USD 600,000 (CHF 590,000) in 2019 to help developing and least-developed countries (LCDs) participate effectively in global trade negotiations. This donation will finance training workshops for officials from WTO member governments to help them deepen their understanding of multilateral trade rules and strengthen their negotiating capacity.
    WTO
  • Lithuania donates EUR 50,000 to enhance developing countries’ trading capacity February 24, 2020
    Lithuania is contributing EUR 50,000 (CHF 53,000) to help developing and least-developed countries take an active part in global trade negotiations. The contribution was acknowledged by Director-General Roberto Azevêdo at a meeting with Lithuania’s Minister of Foreign Affairs, Linas Linkevičius, on 24 February 2020.
    WTO
  • Third anniversary of Trade Facilitation Agreement sees increasing implementation rate February 22, 2020
    Three years since the Trade Facilitation Agreement (TFA) entered into force on 22 February 2017, WTO members have continued to make steady progress in its implementation. Director-General Roberto Azevêdo, on the occasion of the TFA’s third anniversary, welcomed members’ efforts to ensure traders can reap the full benefits of the Agreement.
    WTO

International trade Payment Methods



 

 

International trade transactions tend to be characterised by a higher level of risk and complexity. While, the risks resulting from the transport of the goods could be managed by relying on the Incoterms rules, the risks associated with the payment requires a specific approach.

Indeed, the risk of non-payment is probably one of the most sensitive aspects of cross-border trading, and as such, it requires a central attention.

Whereas for domestic trade the buyer and the seller have to comply with their respective national laws, things are quite different for cross-border transactions since there is no supranational jurisdiction.

From this perspective, adopting an open account method, where the buyer can pay between 30 to 90 days after the reception of the goods, might be risky especially with new buyers with whom no relationships has been built. Needless to say that in case of non-payment issues, the procedure is likely to be costly and time consuming.

Conversely adopting an upfront payment or cash in advance method, could be a risk-free option for the Seller. However, this could impact adversely the Exporters’ competitiveness since it increases cash-flow needs for Importers who will be more likely to look for other suppliers with better conditions. Furthermore, importers are usually reluctant to make upfront payments in foreign countries, by fear of not receiving the ordered goods.

Fortunately, overtime many tools have been developed to address those shortcomings, which enabled the international trade to experience an unprecedented growth.

It is of paramount importance to have a broad perspective of the international trade payment methods available in order choose the best option.

Indeed, there is no one size fit all way of organising payment in international trade, which is why most of the methods developed below have their own advantages, drawbacks and limits.

Now let’s see each International trade payment method in more details